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Home Chiropractic Research Colic Chiropractic Management of an Infant Experiencing Breastfeeding Difficulties and Colic: A Case Study

Chiropractic Management of an Infant Experiencing Breastfeeding Difficulties and Colic: A Case Study

A single case study of a 15 day old emaciated Hispanic male infant experiencing inability to breastfeed and colic since birth, crying constantly, "shaking, screaming, rash, and vomiting during and after feeding." The baby also had "increased distress" 30 minutes after feeding and had excessive abdominal and bowel gas since birth. The mother reported the infant was given a Hepatitis B vaccination within hours after birth.

Examination:   During the examination the infant continuously cried, with high-pitched screams, and full-body shaking. Child had a distended abdomen with excessive bowel gas.

Chiropractic Adjustment:   Adjustment was made to the first cervical vertebra. It was followed by significant reduction of crying, screaming and shaking. The mother commented on the "quietness" of her baby. On the second visit, two days later the mother commented, "This is a completely different baby". The vomiting before and after feeding had ceased. Another adjustment was given. By the third visit, a "significant decrease of symptoms" was reported and complete remission of abdominal findings. Baby had been successfully breastfeeding since last visit. No adjustment was given. By the fourth visit 3 days later, the baby had been symptom free for 5 days at which time he received another Hepatitis B shot with the return of all symptoms to a severe degree. Adjustment was given but there was no reduction of symptoms. The patient was adjusted three more times over the next week with minimal reduction in symptoms. By the eighth visit, eight days after receiving the vaccination the child began to show marked improvement and by the 11th visit, no symptoms were noticed and no adjustment was given.

Sheader, WE   Journal of Clinical Chiropractic Pediatrics, Vol. 4, No. 1, 1999.