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New Study Shows Chiropractic Care for Children is Safe and Effective

Written by Administrator   
Wednesday, 25 June 2008 11:11

A new study published in the CAM Journal FACT has shown that chiropractic care for children is safe and effective.

Children's Safety and Effectiveness Study Accepted at Major CAM Conference!!

The ICPA is pleased to announce that its papers, Treatment-related aggravations, complications and improvements attributed to chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy of pediatric patients: a practice-based survey of practitioners and a survey of parents have been selected for presentation at the 14th Annual Symposium on Complimentary Health Care in Exeter, UK.

This prestigious, international symposium, organised by Professor Edzard Ernst’s Complementary Medicine group in Exeter, is the longest running scientific meeting in its field. It is aimed at providing a forum for all individuals with a research interest in CAM. With an emphasis on original research it offers a unique opportunity to discuss key issues such as effectiveness, safety and costs in critical yet open-minded debate. To read more about the conference visit: http://www.pms.ac.uk/compmed/symposium

The paediatric CAM research day is chaired by Sunita Vohra, University of Alberta, Canada. It will be held on Tuesday, December 11, 2007. The accepted abstracts will be published in a supplement to the December 2007 issue of FACT, Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies. They will also be freely available online here: www.pharmpress.com/fact

Here are the abstracts from the ICPA:

1. Treatment-related aggravations, complications and improvements attributed to chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy of pediatric patients: a practice-based survey of practitioners.

Alcantara J,1 Ohm J,2 and Kunz D3

  1. Research Director, International Chiropractic Pediatric Association, Media, PA, USA and Private Practice of Chiropractic, San Jose, CA, USA
  2. Private Practice of Chiropractic, Media, PA, USA and Executive Director, International Chiropractic Pediatric Association, Media, PA, USA
  3. Research Associate, International Chiropractic Pediatric Association, Media, PA, USA

Objective
To investigate the iatrogenesis and symptom improvements associated with chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) of pediatric patients.

Materials and methods

This study was approved by the IRB of Life University, Atlanta, GA, USA. Data extracted include geographical information, presenting complaints, chiropractic technique and treatment-associated changes such as aggravations, complications and improvements.

Results

The data is derived from 812 pediatric clinical cases attending a total of 7436 office visits. The patients (382 females: 430 males) ranged in age from less than a day to 18 years.  Eighty percent of the patients (N=651) were returning patients, 153 (18.8%) were “new patients” with the remaining 8 as not categorized.  Interestingly, 346 patients were for “wellness check-up.” Of the remaining patients, the 3 most common primary complaints were ear, nose and throat/respiratory disorders followed by musculoskeletal disorders involving the cervical spine and gastrointestinal disorders.

With respect to chiropractic SMT, the three most common techniques practiced were Diversified Technique, Thompson Technique and Cranial Technique.Of the 812 clinical cases, 717 indicated experiencing an improvement with their presenting symptoms, while 9 patients reported treatment-related aggravations. These were described as “soreness” or “fussy.” No treatment-related complications were reported.  Seventy-four cases had reported improvements unrelated to their presenting complaints and described as increased range of motion, improved sleep, improved immune function and improved patient mood.

Conclusion

This study suggests that the chiropractic SMT care of children is safe and effective.

Acknowledgement

This study was funded by the International Chiropractic Pediatric Association, Media, PA, USA.

Presenting Author: Joel Alcantara, BSc, DC
e-mail address: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Form of Presentation: Oral

2. Treatment-related aggravations, complications and improvements attributed to chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy of pediatric patients: a survey of parents.

Alcantara J,1 Ohm J,2 and Kunz D3

  1. Research Director, International Chiropractic Pediatric Association, Media, PA, USA and Private Practice of Chiropractic, San Jose, CA, USA
  2. Private Practice of Chiropractic, Media, PA, USA and Executive Director, International Chiropractic Pediatric Association, Media, PA, USA
  3. Research Associate, International Chiropractic Pediatric Association, Media, PA, USA


Objective

To investigate treatment-related aggravations, complications and improvements with pediatric chiropractic SMT.

Materials and methods

This study was approved by the IRB of Life University, Atlanta, GA.  Data extracted include geographical information of parent (gender, age and level of education completed) and child (i.e., gender and age), presenting complaint(s), the number of office visits and treatment-related aggravations, complications and improvements

Results

The data was from 389 parents (357 females; 31 males, 1 not indicated) reporting on 389 pediatric cases (181 females; 200 males, 8 not reported) attending a total of 3048 office visits. 

The parents are highly educated with 39% having an undergraduate degree. Parental age ranged from 20-57 years with an average of 36.89 years. Their children ranged in age from <24 hours to 18 years with an average of 6.74 years.  The primary complaints, in decreasing frequency, were musculoskeletal disorders, ear, nose, throat/ respiratory disorders and dealing with challenged child. “Wellness care” care was reported by 54% of the parents for their child’s visits.

No treatment-associated complications were reported. Two cases (“soreness and stiffness”) of treatment-related aggravation were reported but were self-limiting. Treatment-associated improvements may be characterized as decreased pain improved mood and increased immune function.  Improvements unrelated to the presenting complaint(s) (N=98) were immune system improvements, improved sleeping and improved emotional state.

Conclusion
This study provides supporting evidence on the safety and effectiveness of chiropractic SMT in children based on parental reports.   

Acknowledgement

This study was funded by the International Chiropractic Pediatric Association, Media, PA, USA.

Meet the ICPA Research Director, Dr. Joel Alcantara.