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Letter From the Editor, Issue #23

Written by Jeanne Ohm, D.C.   
Tuesday, 01 September 2009 00:00

A whole new dimension of communication has opened up with Facebook, Twitter and the rest of the so-called “social networking” sites.

Far-reaching and instantaneous, they connect many people with each other in a way we’ve never experienced before.

I am a lover of communication. I relish all means of connecting with people all over the world, accessing and disseminating information, resources, opinions and perspectives that were once isolated to small and select circles. The dimension that Facebook and Twitter have opened is yet another unprecedented way to reach one another. There is, however, a frantic feeling about them, and this feeling raises some questions for me.

Don’t get me wrong: I have a Facebook and a Twitter account. So does pathways, and so does ICPA. With these tools, we have instant access to floods of people who care to check out our updates. I am also greatly appreciative of the endless stream of information from other Facebookers and Twitterers. It was through Facebook that I first saw the CBS HealthWatch report on the new research revealing serious side effects of ADHD drugs, in which the M.D. on CBS suggested that parents try chiropractic for their child as a safe alternative. It was on Facebook that I discovered a Canadian study questioning the mandatory C-section protocol for breech presentations. Through Facebook, I stay in touch with parents and practitioners and their extraordinary efforts to spread the family wellness message. I do all this and more, almost instantaneously. It is an undisputed communication phenomenon.

And yet, there is this frenzied Facebook feeling and twitching Twitter tension inside me, compelling me to step back and take a deeper look. I have always said the Internet, as a form of instant communication, is merely a reflection of the underdeveloped yet inherent communication potential we have as human beings. Instantaneous, simultaneous and soul to soul, we have all experienced the ability of our superconsciousness to connect with others. Simple examples of this phenomenon include thinking about a person right before they call or show up, following a hunch only to find ourselves in the right place at the right time, and the myriad ways parents intuitively connect with their children.

The ability to instantly connect via social media is but a reflection of our inherent capacity to connect with each other without a technological medium. Does our fascination with the online networking and instant communication really represent our true desire to develop our awareness and use of superconscious connectivity? If so, then by being so absorbed in this material hard copy and its rapid-fire means of delivery, are we enhancing or impeding our potential to recognize and develop these skills from within?

Metaphysical scientists and authors such as Gregg Braden, Wayne Dyer, Bruce Lipton, Eckhart Tolle, Lynne McTaggart, Deepak Chopra, Larry Dossey, Joe Dispenza, John Demartini and the founders of the Institute of Noetic Sciences, to name some of my favorites, continuously explore our inherent ability to be in constant communication with each other. They refer to this ever-present and accessible communications medium as the “divine matrix,” “the non-local mind,” “the patterns that connect”— in other words, the all-pervasive intelligent energy of the universe. Concepts like tipping point, critical mass, synchronicity, conscious intent and collective consciousness are becoming a part of everyday language, as we embrace our unlimited potential for connectivity.

Through our deeper selves, in this newly defined dimension, we are all in constant communication with each other and all existence. However, let us be reminded what the wise ones teach: From a place of love, with grateful expectation and present time consciousness, we are able to access this matrix and connect.

So back to my question: Is the exploding popularity of these instant messaging systems like Facebook and Twitter a reflection of our deeper desire and potential for real instant messaging? Will our use of these technological systems assist us in our evolution to be more conscious of the connective divine matrix? Or will they create a false sense of fulfillment and distract us from refining our inherent abilities for a superconscious connection?

Jeanne Ohm, DCFacebook and Twitter can be a means of growth, bridging the gap between modern technology and ancient wisdom. We can use them as a practical way to communicate via technology, as well as tools to develop our more subtle, higher connectivity with each other. While on Facebook or Twitter, swept up in the momentum of instant communication, let’s try an experiment. Before our fingers begin automatically typing, let’s take one moment to be consciously present, and from soul to soul, heart to heart, send an intentional blessing of love to the person with whom we’re communicating. Then, with grateful expectation, we can be sure our blessings and messages are traveling not only across our instantaneous social media, but also our inherent superconsciousness. With the frequency that Facebook and Twitter are being used and the amount of people they reach, imagine the momentous ripple effect of each sent message.

Wow! I can feel the exhilarated rush in consciousness already.

Many Blessings,
Jeanne Ohm, DC


Pathways Issue 23 CoverThis article appeared in Pathways to Family Wellness magazine, Issue #23.