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Vertebral Subluxation Correlated with Somatic,Visceral and Immune Complaints: An Analysis of 650 Children Under Chiropractic Care

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Background: We evaluated children and their neuromuscular, biomechanical, neuro-homeostatic development and patterning in order to gain some insight into the perplexing problem of health attainment. We describe the nuances and effects of a new subluxation pattern seen in children - the Pelvic Distortion Subluxation Complex (PDSC). We feel that the PDSC is responsible, partially or fully, for a number of adaptive neurological patterns and kinesiopathological reflexes that can propagate a myriad of conditions - these seem to arise in childhood and plague individuals into adulthood. The authors maintain that PDSC is an entity amenable to correction - thereby restoring homeostasis.

Objective: It is the author’s contention that many, if not the preponderance of conditions seen in adults, have their origins in the childhood years. The objective of this paper is to describe a new subluxation pattern seen in children - the Pelvic Distortion Subluxation Complex which we found to be a common denoninator in many children’s health issues.

Conclusion: The process of neurological learning or programming of the central nervous system with respect to locomotion, posture, proprioception, and body kinetics begins within a few short months after birth. Our study revealed a pattern of pelvic dysfunction correlated with numerous somatic, visceral and immune complaints. These dysfunctions should be discovered as early as possible in a child’s development to effect a correction and the relationship between these dysfunctions and ill health should be further studied.

Ogi Ressel BSc, DC, DACBR(C), FICPA and Robert Rudy BSc, DC, FICPA. Journal of Vertebral Subluxation Research ~ October 18, 2004 ~ Pages 1-23. Abstract